Wow! The FLAX Language System – So Much Open Data

dogelinguistics

The doge meme teaches us so much about language learning and how challenging it can be to accurately combine words and patterns when using another language. The FLAX language system teaches us so much about how we can avoid using dodgy language by employing powerful open-source language analysis tools and authentic language resources.

flaxHeader_leftlinkedup trophyThe FLAX (Flexible Language Acquisition) project has won the LinkedUp Vici Competition for tools and demos that use open or linked data for educational purposes. This post is the one I wrote to accompany our project submission to the LinkedUp challenge.

FLAX is an open-source software system designed to automate the production and delivery of interactive digital language collections. Exercise material comes from digital libraries (language corpora, web data, open access publications, open educational resources) for a virtually endless supply of authentic language learning in context. With simple interface designs, FLAX has been designed so that non-expert users — language teachers, language learners, subject specialists, instructional design and e-learning support teams — can build their own language collections.

The FLAX software can be freely downloaded to build language collections with any text-based content and supporting audio-visual material, for both online and classroom use. FLAX uses the Greenstone suite of open-source multilingual software for building and distributing digital library collections, which can be published on the Internet or on CD-ROM. Issued under the terms of the GNU General Public License, Greenstone is produced by the New Zealand Digital Library Project at the University of Waikato, and developed and distributed in cooperation with UNESCO and the Human Info NGO.

REMIX WITH FLAX

images_entries_entry_image_file_-_entry_id-4433_-_20111221124909164.w_420.h_280.m_crop.a_center.v_topAt FLAX we understand that content and data vary in terms of licensing restrictions, depending on the publishing strategies adopted by institutions for the usage of their content and data. FLAX has, therefore, been designed to offer a flexible open-source suite of linguistic support options for enhancing such content and data across both open and closed platforms.

Featuring the Latest in Artificial Intelligence &

Natural Language Processing Software Designs

Within the FLAX bag of tricks, we have the open-source Wikipedia Miner Toolkit, which links in related words, topics and definitions from Wikipedia and Wiktionary as can be seen below in the Learning Collocations collection  (click on the image to expand and visit the toolkit in action).

wikiminer
Wikipedia Mining Tool in FLAX Learning Collocations Collection – click on the image to expand and visit the collection

Featuring Open Data

Available on the FLAX website are completed collections and on-going collections development with registered users. Current research and development with the FLAX Law Collections is based entirely on open resources selected by language teachers and legal English researchers as shown in the table below. These collections demonstrate how users can build collections in FLAX according to their interests and needs.

Law Collections in FLAX

flaxheadercropped

Type of Resource

Number and Source of Collection Resources

Open Access Law research articles
40 Articles (DOAJ – Directory of Open Access Journals, with Creative Commons licenses for the development of derivatives)
MOOC lecture transcripts and videos (streamed via YouTube and Vimeo)
4 MOOC Collections: English Common Law (University of London with Coursera), Age of Globalization (Texas at Austin with edX), Copyright Law (Harvard with edX), Environmental Politics and Law (OpenYale)
Podcast audio files and transcripts (OpenSpires)
15 Lectures (Oxford Law Faculty, Centre for Socio-Legal Studies and Department of Continuing Education)
PhD Law thesis writing
50-70 EThoS Theses (sections: abstracts, introductions, conclusions) at the British Library (Open Access but not licensed as Creative Commons – permission for reuse granted by participating Higher Education Institutions)
British Law Reports Corpus (BLaRC)
8.8 million-word corpus derived from free legal sources at the British and Irish Legal Information Institute (BAILII) aggregation website
FLAX Wikipedia English
Linking in a reformatted version of Wikipedia (English version), providing key terms and concepts as a powerful gloss resource for the Law Collections.
FLAX Learning Collocations
Linking in lexico-grammatical phrases from the British National Corpus (BNC) of 100 million words, the British Academic Written English corpus (BAWE) of 2500 pieces of assessed university student writing from across the disciplines, and the re-formatted Wikipedia corpus in English.
FLAX Web Phrases
Linking in a reformatted Google n-gram corpus (English version) containing 380 million five-word sequences drawn from a vocabulary of 145,000 words.

FLAX Training Videos

Featuring Game-based Activities

Click on the image below to explore the different activities that can be applied to language collections in FLAX.
flaxactivitiesrevised1flaxactivitiesrevised2

FLAX Apps for AndroidAbout FLAX

We also have a suite of free game-based FLAX apps for Android devices. Now you can interact with the types of activities listed above while you’re learning on the move. Click on the FLAX app icon to the right to access and download the apps and enjoy!

 collocsmatchingapp  collocmatchingapp

FLAX Research & Development

oerresearchhubTo date, we have distributed the English Common Law and the Age of Globalization MOOC collections in FLAX to thousands of registered learners in over a 100 countries – wow!

A collaborative investigation is underway with FLAX and the Open Educational Resources Research Hub (OERRH), whereby a cluster of revised OER research hypotheses are currently being employed to evaluate the impact of developing and using open language collections in FLAX with informal MOOC learners as well as formal English language and translation students.

2 Comments

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  1. Interesting stuff and something I’m keen to research more. I recently read your paper on ‘Second Language Learning in the Context of MOOCs’, but am wondering – is the MOOC platform provider OK with this kind of reuse of materials? Could I attempt this type of reuse using another MOOC from the same provider?

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    • Hi Steve, thanks for reading and for your interest. You ask good questions about reuse. The copyright is always going to be with the institution hosting the MOOC so where necessary it’s best to contact the particular university. With the demonstration Law Collections in FLAX I’ve sourced MOOC resources from institutions that have already released their learning content as OER so I didn’t need to request further permissions. However, because I’m interested in researching the learners’ use and perceptions of the FLAX MOOC language support resources, I have been in touch with the people behind these MOOCs. This is the same for Vincent Racaniello’s virology work at Columbia, which I wrote about in the paper you mentioned from the CSEDU conference event. At the moment we’re hosting these language support collections derived from MOOC content on our FLAX website. However, if any of the MOOC providers wished to embed our software in their platforms they would be able to as the FLAX software code is released under a public GNU open-source licence. This is something we’d like to explore, especially with MOOC platforms like the one at edX being open-source as well. We’re hoping that the research we’re doing in this area for providing domain-specific language support through the reuse of MOOC content will catch on in open education as well as in traditional classroom-based language education. The beauty of OER and open-source is the flexibility for resource reuse across different contexts of learning.

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